7 Dos And Dont’s To Help You Succeed As A Digital Nomad

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The idea of working remotely is growing in popularity by the day as people long to cut ties with their nine-to-five schedule and explore the globe. But there’s more to being a digital nomad than sitting blissfully on a laptop by the beach. Making the transition to a remote lifestyle requires lots of careful planning, which can begin with a read of these simple tips.

DO your research

Oxygen, water and food are key to life. For digital nomads, a solid Wi-Fi connection can definitely be added to this list. Without the internet, it’s likely that you’ll struggle to do much work, if at all, so it’s vital that you research this factor before making a move to your next destination. Failing to do so may result in you being stuck on a remote Thai island where it’s virtually impossible to get anything done – I learned this the hard way.

Other factors worth looking into before planting your roots are the cost of accommodation, seasonal weather changes, visa requirements and community life. Most digital nomad hubs have expat/nomad Facebook pages where you can get all of your questions answered.

DO structure your work days

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There’s a saying that goes, “all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.” Well, all play and no work can be equally as detrimental for digital nomads. When transitioning from a regular work structure to remote employment, it can be difficult to strike the right balance between work and relaxation time. Some people end up working 24/7, while others spend more time immersed in the crystal-clear ocean than in their workload. Plan out work and leisure time from the get-go to prevent your brain or bank balance from getting burned out.

DO seek out others

While working remotely definitely has its perks, admittedly, it can become isolating. It’s easy to take your colleagues for granted when you’re working in a typical nine-to-five job, but after you leave, you’ll begin to miss the work banter, Friday afternoon excitement and even your colleague’s extremely distracting whistling. Let’s face it, a pet cat or the odd Skype call to your parents are no substitute for true social contact.

Whether you’ve been thinking of joining a club or starting a new hobby, this new chapter in your life is the perfect opportunity to do so. Co-working spaces also serve a double purpose for digital nomads in that they give you a place to be productive while providing an opportunity to meet like-minded people.

DO be financially secure

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If you’re reading this from a stuffy grey office somewhere on a Monday morning, by now you’ve probably already decided to pack all your belongings and begin your new digital nomad life. Before you hand in your resignation, hear me out! The early days of your remote lifestyle are bound to be unpredictable, so it is really crucial to build up your savings before taking the plunge. Not only will this offer you some security should your work be slow to take off, it’ll also mean that you can allow yourself time to relax and enjoy your new base during those initial few weeks.

DON’T work with friends

Working with another digital nomad friend from a café sounds like the ideal situation. Two brains are better than one, right? While it may appear to be the recipe for productivity, the reality is that you’ll spend more time sharing cake and discussing the latest episode of Stranger Things in great detail than doing actual work. Before you know it, it’s four hours later, you’ve spent your daily budget on three coffees and you have only three words of your article written. Unless you’re working on a project together or can trust one another to keep the chit chat to a minimum, it’s probably best to tell your friend you’ll catch them later.

DON’T travel too much

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It can be tempting to pinpoint dozens of places on the map when you switch to the digital nomad lifestyle. However, with no boss at home telling you to be back in a fortnight, it’s important to remind yourself that you aren’t in any rush. Working remotely is much easier when you travel slowly.

Yes, working from airports, trains and planes is doable, but if you are hopping to a new country every week while simultaneously trying to meet deadlines, your energy and motivation are sure to wane. Plant your roots in your first destination and get to know the place and its people. You have all the time in the world to tick off that bucket list.

DON’T give up

Unless you secure remote work before moving, chances are that finding jobs online can be a slow and tedious process. You may have a rake of experience and the best degree in your field and still be met with constant rejection from employers, or worse, no responses at all. It’s hard, but the most important thing is to remain patient and persistent.

Instead of crying into your keyboard when nobody is getting back to you, use your free time to push forward. Research other opportunities, expand your skillset with an online course, network with potential employers… keep your goal in sight and things will eventually work out.

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Amy Lewis is a freelance journalist from Ireland currently finding her way around South East Asia. Along with exploring new countries and cultures, she is extremely passionate about nature and spends a lot of her time abroad simply sitting and listening to the birds.

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